#MarketTiming – Pot stocks partying like it’s 1999

Canada legalizes marijuana and the stocks get high.

In the past ten trading days, with confirmation from long-term breadth as a market-timing signal, sector newcomer TLRY is up 200%, CRON up 97%, all up, CGC 50%, the sector ETF MJ (this might be the more reasonable way to play the sector), even long-term steady, GWPH, which actually makes money in medical marijuana is up nicely. The cash/percentage gains per $100K invested are the white flags on the lower right of the charts below.

In 1999, it was the dot-coms gone crazy with no more than hopes and dreams of massive monies to be made. With, most notably AMZN, the hopes and dreams have come more than true. So it’s likely to be with cannabis too in the fullness of time, but like in 1999 with the dot-comes, it is now no more than party time.

If anyone rolled these up ten days ago, congratulations! If not, they will correct, probably any moment now with the market but, no matter, these stocks will be obvious prospects for the next market upswing.

(click on the chart for a larger view)

#Bitcoin – Don’t follow this crypto mania much but…

But I took a look today to see what’s going on lately.

Are you kidding me? There are people out there claiming this will replace the dollar? Replace gold?

Can’t anyone spell T-U-L-I-P-S?

I thought this would end when lap dancers in New Orleans started putting bar-code tattoos on their boobs to collect bitcoin tips.

Now that the drug dealers and money launderers have made a market a few notable institutions (like Microsoft for heavens sake!) had gotten sucked into, and computer nerds in bedrooms with potato chips are “mining” in their spare time, and even more than a few suburban crazies have gone crazy over, what is the real future for this crap? It is in market history (duh, the tulips), and it is not good.

Does anyone actually want to put their savings in this for a buy-and-hold overnight?

That this stuff is priced in U.S. Dollars should tell everyone everything that needs to be told.

(click to enlarge)

$BID And $TIF – What do the rich folk do?

They buy stocks, and spend money on all sorts of luxuries – second, third, fourth houses, paintings, baubles, antiquities… Just about anything that can be had at auction or in blue boxes.

And when they quit… Let’s just say they pull the BID (see charts below).

As bellwethers of the future market action BID (Sotheby’s) and TIF (Tiffany’s) are always worth watching. The timing is not precise but when they are long and strong the bull market is strong also but when they fall they tend to fall ahead of time. BID particularly.

Just bringing this up since I happened to notice BID seems to have had quite a sell-off lately, and it appears TIF could follow with a lot of downside space to drop into.

Just a cautionary note to remind anyone used to bull-market stock moves that whatever goes up can also go down.

(click on the charts for a larger view)

#MarketTiming $QQQ – tomorrow the bounce…

After three days down in the Nasdaq, two of them hard downs, it is very likely time for a bounce tomorrow.

All of my bellwether stocks, as suggested yesterday (see posts below), followed through with losses today, led by NFLX down 5.5%. With the exception of AAPL and GOOGL they are all oversold. In addition forty of my nifty-fifty stocks are on sells with 34 of those oversold. Forty or more sells usually means we are at the bottom or the beginning of a swing bottom before a bounce.

Most likely he Nasdaq Composite Index has gone down too far too fast (see chart below). Focus on the chart and note that each time the blue histogram pierces the green lines, what happens next is a bounce, sometimes a substantial bounce. That is the most compelling technical case for timing a bounce for tomorrow. Also note if there is a bounce, it will likely not be a bottom. Bottoms and subsequent rallies come after retests.

This time could be an exception of course since the market can do anything it wants any time it wants but for now, I’m watching tomorrow open primarily for some play on the long side.

(click on the chart for a larger view)

#MarketTiming – a surge that falters…

A couple of weeks ago as long-term breadth turned up in the midst of an on-going bull market suggested that the bellwether stocks that have so long mattered would move up again.

That didn’t happen.

My “bellwethers” are TSLA, NFLX, AMZN, GOOGL, TWTR, BIDU, AAPL, FB, NVDA, BABA.

Long-term breadth turned down the next day and scattered the bellwether cluster — some up, some down, some going huh, what’s happening. Four days later they again tried to rally (see the chart panel below) but Friday they were hit harder than ever. With exception now of AMZN, they are all falling apart, led by the 20% disaster in FB and now the equivalent in TWTR. This usually does not happen in bull markets.

Chart by chart they look vulnerable to more decline. If they follow through to the down side this coming week, one will have to question if this is still a bull market or is the bear market beginning to emerge.

(click on the charts for a larger view)

$SPX $SPY – walking the edge of the long-term cliff…

As we end another month and the first half of the year, I thought I’d take a quick look at a long-term monthly of chart of the SPX/SPY, the S&P 500 index and its primary ETF.

Someone (probably the great trader, Linda Raschke) once said if the short term is confusing in the stock market just back to a longer term view and all will become clear.

So what is clear in the here and now?

The bull market is still in progress (see chart below) although that progress has been stalled for this year to date.

The current upswing is completing a three-month rally so a sell-off could come any day now.

The technical indicators MACD and CCI are lagging, setting up as in the past (see the red rectangles on the chart) for a possible sell-off. But at the moment the pattern this time is not complete.

If the SPX had closed lower this month than it closed last month and its volume finished higher than its volume last month, I’d have to say the sell-off is likely right now. But that didn’t happen.

Obviously, the market in general is walking along a cliff (see the blue trend lines)… But until it falls off that doesn’t matter.

So is it going higher? I hate to but I have to shrug on that. Could be but with that cliff edge so close better to be be alert, and best to put in place some protections like trailing stops on any long-term investments.

Buying this? Okay, it remains a bull after all. But, me thinks, only for the short-term while standing every day next to the exit door. If the market charges higher, the short term will have you in, and if it goes screaming lower the short term will take you out.

(click on the chart for a larger view)

#MarketTiming the second biggest mountain in the stock market range

Great article and charts from Visual Capitalist:

VISUALIZING THE LONGEST BULL MARKETS IN THE MODERN ERA

If this current bull market can hold for two more months, it will become the longest bull market in the modern era, topping the dot-come bubble.

Uh, did I slip and say “bubble”?

The question, as always, is what comes next and when.

What comes next is obvious – what goes up also goes down. The “when” is the tricky part but it would seem the when is getting closer by the day. I find it hard to believe in percentage gain it can top the dot-com mania but it is possible. If it does, it’s likely the higher it goes, the farther it falls.

One of the most famous quotes in investing history is from Bernard Baruch: “I made my money by selling too soon.”

Might want to keep Baruch in mind as each market pundit, each brokerage analyst, each brokerage, continues to say invest now, invest for the long term, while staring at the second highest mountain in the great rocky stock market range.

(click on link or this chart for a larger view)

#HousingStocks and the three little bears…

It is nearly impossible to call a market top before it becomes obvious it has already happened but the housing stocks have come closest in the past to doing it.

Which is why I keep an eye on LEN, KBH, DHI, MDC, NVR, TOL, PHM AND TOL. If all is not quite well with the market (and the economy for that matter), they are often the first to show the strain.

As far back as December of last year I posted an entry here at what I suspected might the first warning sign:

Gonna Huff and Puff and Blow Your House Down

And again in early February of this year, as the SPY began to break down, being led by the housing sector, I posted a warning here to also watch the banking stocks:

Housing stocks – the tails that wag the banking dogs

And finally this last April 24th, another post looking back at the history of these tell-tale stocks:

Housing stocks – Remembering 2008

Which bring us to today.

The ten-year bond rate went through 3% for the first time since 2011, with no sign of turning back, and it appears (obviously) the housing sector did not like it (see the chart panel below).

In 2007, this sector had a long sideways to up move after the initial hard break that had all the stock pundits (on CNBC and elsewhere) proclaiming the market pull back was over. The banks were even making new highs at the time (they are not now).

Then the plunge began into 2008.

The hard break in this sector this year has many of these same housing stocks down 20% already. And they have moved generally sideways — some with a downward bias — since mid-February before today’s four and five percent drops as it appears they are breaking down from their months-long consolidations just like last time.

On the chart panel below, see LEN, DHI, TOL and HOV particularly.

Is this the sign the bears have noticed this Goldilocks bull market has been eating their porridge and sleeping in their bed for far too long? There is a chance they are about to chase her out of the house running for her life into the deep dark forest of the time to come. And if so, the banking stocks will scurry after…

(click on the chart for a larger view)

Declining Margin Debt – the bullish scenario

Margin debt, money borrowed to leverage the market, has for now topped and is in decline. Before the top in February it had reached levels far beyond the surges in 2000 and 2007, which could be an ominous indication of what is to come when and if margin debt continues to unravel.

See the chart below and the charts in the link.

Does the fact that it is coming down as major players try to ease out of their leveraged positions mean the market, measured by the S&P 500 stock index (SPX), has also topped? For the time being it would appear it has but history would say that’s not necessarily so.

MARGIN DEBT AND THE MARKET

From the link:

“The first chart shows the two series in real terms — adjusted for inflation to today’s dollar using the Consumer Price Index as the deflator. At the 1997 start date, we were well into the Boomer Bull Market that began in 1982 and approaching the start of the Tech Bubble that shaped investor sentiment during the second half of the decade. The astonishing surge in leverage in late 1999 peaked in March 2000, the same month that the S&P 500 hit its all-time daily high, although the highest monthly close for that year was five months later in August. A similar surge began in 2006, peaking in July 2007, three months before the market peak.”

Simply put, that would mean there is at least another new high coming in the new few months (the summer rally?) before any significant bearish behavior in the stocks.

The heads up is to say those highs, if they come, will be opportunities to sell, or at least tighten stops on long-term investments. A second look at the chart shows that the SPX, coming off highs in margin debt, declines close to 50%. Those were real bear markets. The next one could be worse. Regardless, no matter how low it goes, it is best to be avoided.

There are two possibilities it could be somewhat different this time. One, margin debt itself could surge to another new high along with a strong months-long market rally (see the jingle-jangle in 2015 on the chart); or two, the top is already in and the next leg down (given how astronomically high the margin debt is beyond 2000 and 2007) could be a dead bull dropping right out of the sky (they can not fly forever).

(click on the chart for larger view)