#MarketTiming – To short the usual suspects…

The general market has had a dandy little bounce the last two days and may continue to the upside into the holiday weekend.

But sometimes in the endless quest to detect “what happens next” it is not what is happening, but instead it is what is not happening.

Since most stocks in most sectors rally with a rising mass market those that don’t usually get hit the hardest with the market turns.

Since I think all of the market’s rallies now are bounces to be sold until the biggest reward comes when the realization sets in that there is nothing supporting this supposed bull market except the fumes in the Fed’s liquidity tank, I’ve taken a look around to what is not bouncing.

Really took just a glance around.

Didn’t have to look much past the usual suspects, the airlines, cruise ships, theater chains, and coal. Those first three sectors are severely distressed by the pandemic in this the worst of times. Coal is always a short even in the best of times.

Take a look at the two-day charts below to see the lack of bounce these last two days in all of these stocks.

AIRLINES — AAL, ALK, DAL, LUV, UAL, and most importantly, BA. Hope springs eternal in this sector but it does not fly. ALK has canceled 130 flights so far and mothballed 30 airliners. AAL and UAL, in desperation, have said they will fill their flights to capacity while others have said they have eliminated middle seating in an attempt to social distance, but it is doubtful the hordes of passengers they packed in previous to the pandemic will return any time soon. They are going to lose money, maybe on every flight. BA rallied yesterday on news of 737 MAX re-certification tests as if anyone is going to want to order that plane anytime soon, especially since most airlines are in the process of canceling orders (Norwegian Airlines canceled 97 orders today).

CRUISE LINES – CCL, RCL, NCLH. What’s there to say further? Can cheaply offered luxury cancel the memories of being trapped on cruises of contagion and death while the charlatan President of the United States, no less, says he would rather have passengers die there than muck up his Coronavirus positive case counts on shore? And what’s it going to cost to hire crew members for those voyages, if any crew can be hired at all?

THEATER CHAINS – AMC, CNK (which now owns Regal, the largest chain in the US). These movie theaters have a chance to make adjustment to cope with social distancing but still…even for the biggest blockbuster offering it will be irresponsible to operate at more than 50% capacity (if not illegal in some states). How much profit margin is there in half a house?

COAL STOCKS – BTU, ARCH, SXC, CNX. Coal, no matter how many times Trump says he loves it, has no sustainable future. Just compare the stocks in the sector to the solar stocks. On the next leg down, it looks as if BTU particularly may once again wipe out shareholder equity with yet another bankruptcy filing.

It’s going to take some market timing to pick the entries for when these stocks break down again. For me that’s watching what NYMO and NYSI, as my prime measures of mass-market psychology, are doing, but I assume anyone capable to shorting has their own indicators to rely on.

Regardless, when the time comes, I’m looking to take the slide down in what has now become the USA’s continued botched-coronavirus-response carnival.

(click on the chart for a larger view)

#STOCKS — $BA and its birds of a feather…

This is what happens when the US taxpayers put up $50 or so billion dollars to buy your company and then don’t take it away from the shareholders.

BA (Boeing) is up 85 percent this week (in four days) thanks to the general market bounce and being a large part of a $50-billion taxpayer bailout in the stimulus bill.

It’s up 55 percentage points higher than the next nearest stocks in the DOW Industrial Average (CVS, UTX, HD).

All those percentage points this week for a company that was crying for a bailout even before the market selloff, and a company that last week shut down its operations in the Puget Sound area (laying off 7000 employees) even before the Washington State Governor ordered ALL essential business closed to fight the virus.

It turned out in the last couple of years, Boeing has become the poster child of all of American corporate malfeasance. Buying back stocks with tax breaks instead of attending to core businesses. Taking advantage of artificially low interest rates, courtesy of a loose Federal Reserve, to add debt and to hide diminishing earnings per share. Having wildly over paid chief executives. Those guys at Boeing a few years back moved their executive offices to Dennis Hastert’s district in Chicago when he was Speaker of the House – just before he was indicted and sent to prison. Having atrocious labor relations. They moved an entire manufacturing division to South Carolina to avoid the unions in Seattle and had to admit later they would never make up the multi-billion-dollar shortfall it took to train those yahoos to make airplaines. And finally, characteristically in the Trump era, the company got caught slipshod production values, but not before it killed a lot of passengers in two crashes. Simply said, it’s probably more known for the Max-737 and that fuck-up grounding of what? A third of the fleet?

Nevertheless Boeing, admittedly, is also so important to the US economy it is truly too big to die. It does not, however, need yet another corporate bailout by beleaguered US taxpayers.

It needs to be nationalized.

Instead, it’s pretty much leading the bounce and flying in the same thin bear-market air as the rest of the market.

And along with it, there are the rest of the birds feahtered in its bailout nest. AAL (American Airlines) up 45%, DAL (Delta) up 44%, UAL (United) up 39%, ALGT (Allegiant) up 39%. We all love these airlines, right? Love the service? Paying for extra bags? Getting stranded by canceled flights?

And the food, airline food, now that’s the best the world has to offer, right?

See the chart below. Big pop. And, of course, it better not come down with the next decline otherwise the big check from the taxpayers will be wasted.

(Click on the chart to get the picture)

$UAL $DAL $AA – time for buyouts instead of bailouts?

Bloomberg reported yesterday that the major American airlines used their free cash flow for buybacks and may be bankrupt by May.

See this CASH FLOW LINK and this BANKRUPTCY LINK.

Trump is already talking a taxpayer bailout.

How about buyouts instead?

Again and again, these industries (last time it was the banks) recklessly practice free-market capitalism and eventually a crisis comes and again they need a socialist intervention to go on with their business as usual.

Don’t these guys ever plan ahead? Don’t they ever realize all good times come to an end to one degree or another (all bad times too for that matter)?

Isn’t it time for this periodic sucking on the taxpayer tit stops? Maybe a lesson needs to be learned. If the taxpayer is going to have to subsidize and/or finally bail them out in the end, maybe it’s time the taxpayers take ownership.

Not that Trump would know what to do being on the opposite side of his own bankruptcy history but he won’t be President forever (at least I hope American voters have wised up enough to flush the con king).

Anyway, this is what these once high flying birdS look like crash landing together:

(click on the chart for a larger view)